African Gray Parrots https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com African Grey Parrots Care Fri, 15 May 2020 03:21:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/cropped-africangreyparrots-book-cover-32x32.jpg African Gray Parrots https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com 32 32 What to Feed Your African Grey? https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/what-to-feed-your-african-grey/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=what-to-feed-your-african-grey https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/what-to-feed-your-african-grey/#respond Tue, 26 May 2020 03:02:00 +0000 https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/?p=903 What to feed your African Grey? African Grey parrots are largely considered omnivorous due to lack of fixed food preferences. Its food preferences are mostly based on its natural habitat.  Thankfully, today’s supplements have opened new and healthy options for pet owners. What to feed your African Grey? Contrary to popular belief, birds do not […]

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What to feed your African Grey? African Grey parrots are largely considered omnivorous due to lack of fixed food preferences. Its food preferences are mostly based on its natural habitat.  Thankfully, today’s supplements have opened new and healthy options for pet owners. What to feed your African Grey? Contrary to popular belief, birds do not live by seed alone! A seed only diet can be extremely dangerous because it can result in nutrient deficiency and diseases due to its limited nutrients, vitamins and minerals which could shorten the life expectancy of your parrot. What to feed your African Grey? Greys need a good quality pellet diet for it to be healthy. Like humans, parrots need a balanced diet. You should be able to feed your bird with fresh vegetables especially green leafy ones as well as fruit and grain daily.

Types of Food for Your African Grey

What to feed your African Grey? African Grey Parrots love to eat seeds! Palm fruit seeds are highly recommended on a Grey parrot’s diet plan. However as mentioned earlier, you still need to offer a proper balance of fruits and vegetables because that will keep the bird’s metabolic system strong. African greys need 3-4 teaspoons per day of a pellet or seed-based, fortified parrot diet.

Vegetables are a rich source of natural fiber for the body. As compared to other birds, there are a few vegetables which is essential for an African Grey, these vegetables not only provide fiber but also nutrition. Just make sure they are properly washed before feeding to your pet.

Fruits are healthy and sweet, they are a natural source of sugars for the parrots. Below are list of fruits that are highly recommended by veterinarians. Keep in mind that you need to get your vet’s approval before trying a new fruit for your African Grey Parrot. This may include melons, dried dates, figs, gooseberries, mango and papaya; grapes, guava, honeydew, kiwi, apples; banana; blackcurrant; blueberry; cantaloupe; cherry; pear; pineapple; pomegranate; raspberry; strawberry

Healthy Supplements

What to feed your African Grey? The only supplement necessary in feeding your parrot is Calcium. As mentioned before, grey birds need the most amount of Calcium than any other kinds of parrots. Calcium is usually found in the form of a cuttlebone or Calcium treat that is attached inside your bird cage. You can also offer a powdered supplement such as packaged oyster shell which can be added directly to your pet’s food. Follow the instructions on the supplement package. Calcium is vital for muscle contraction, blood clotting, heart functions, bone growth and strength. The bird should be exposed to UVB light for at least 3-4 hours a day, for optimal physiologic use of the calcium you are giving your bird.

Vitamin is definitely an important part of any diet because it fulfills body requirements but as a precaution most Grey parrots on a pelleted diet do not require additional vitamins therefore a regular medical consultation to your veterinary is highly advised to ensure that your bird is getting proper diet. Some Greys are prone to vitamin A deficiencies but you should not provide vitamins without an expert’s prescription.

Fatty acids are part of a balanced diet combined with minerals, vitamins and calcium. Fatty acid intake serves as an effective skin and feather care agent. It also provides the ability to develop a better immune system so that it may survive possible common diseases among the bird family. It also plays an important role in reducing the risk of heart attacks as well as lowering the cholesterol level.

What Not to Feed Your Pet

Some foods are specifically toxic for your African Grey Parrot. Make sure that your bird never gets to eat one of the toxic items below and ensure that an avian veterinary checks your bird every now and then. These harmful foods is as important as selecting the right supplements and food items for your bird. The following list of plants, fruits and beans are toxic for African Grey Parrots include avocado; azalea; baneberry; beans; coffee, coffee Bean; eucalyptus; grass hyacinth; marijuana (Hemp); oak; red maple; tobacco; umbrella plant; white cedar, berry and yellow Jasmine among others.

Best Food Brands for Your African Greys

Sleek & Sassy Garden Large Hookbill

What to feed your African Grey? This brand came out to the market in 1983. For many decades, this brand is still famous in the field of bird food. Among them, Sleek & Sassy Garden Large Hookbill seems to be one of the most popular products of this brand. So many pet owners choose it for their African Grey because of the nutritious ingredients. All the elements are natural without sulfites or even artificial colors. Therefore, you could feel comfortable to purchase this item for your lovely friends.

The Sleek & Sassy Garden Large Hookbill food is a mixture of vegetables and fruits which provide the animals enough nutrition and power. In addition to this, blended food also contains the amino acid, vitamin, and mineral, which are suitable for the activities of parrot.

All the materials are natural including trophic seeds: Whole Grains, Legumes, Seeds, Papaya, Banana, Red Chili Peppers, Pineapple, Carrots, Sweet Potato, and many other seeds. It is really an advanced mixture. In addition to this, this product also has enzymes in the list of ingredients. The enzymes can exist in the oxygen environment. So, if there is no oxygen on the package, the enzymes’ elements will be killed, and the nutritional value will be reduced.

As a result, this brand does not blow the nitrogen to the package or abstract oxygen to prolong the expiry date. They keep the oxygen inside the bag to maximize nutrition. The food should be kept on the freezer device, and you need to put it back to the fridge after use. If you are preserving it in the refrigerator and then put them at the room temperature for a long time, the food will create moisture and reduce the quality. In addition, remember to remove the left-over food in the jailbird every day.

 Zeigler Parrot Maintenance

This food is suitable for not only the parrot but also the cockatoos. The company removed all the seed hulls so that the parrot can eat all the seeds easily. The ingredients in the food are good for body conditioning. They are amino acids, minerals, and vitamins. Besides, these natural materials also play an important role in the feathering process.

The minerals and vitamin C in Zeiglers Parrot Maintenance have the function of developing and recovering the tissue. Besides, the flavour is really attractive because of the scent of the fruit. The nitrogen is added to the package in order to maintain the freshness. This product was researched and developed by the U.S animal food specialist.

According to many parrot breeders, the Zeiglers Parrot Maintenance provides enough nutrition for the growth of parrot. If you fed your pet with this type of food, usually, it will thrive well. The seeds are kept in a sealed box so that the food gets the perfect preservation. You just need to take out enough dosage for your bird.

Volkman Avian Science Super African Grey

Volkman Avian Science Super African Grey is the exclusive food for parrots. This is the nutritious dub, which is good for the growth of the bird. With high-quality seeds, it is one of the best-rate foods according to many reviewers. People say that it is the prior choice for birds in the larger size. This product is a mixture of seeds and dehydrated vegetables and fruits.

The ingredients contain many types of natural seeds: Safflower Seed, Choline Chloride, Coconut, Dehydrated Carrot, Magnesium Oxide, Zinc Oxide, Sun-Cured Peaches, and many other types of ingredients. This food has a special formula for the birds. This mixture is suitable for the specific needs of this animal. The product has a fruity flavour, which is delicious and attracts the birds. The company freshly packs these seeds. Before packing, the ingredients are triple cleaned to remove the pother so that we have a type of pure foodstuffs.

Besides the vitamins and calcium, the producer implements the cuttlebone for more nutrition, and that brings a healthy life for pets. However, besides the natural flavours, this food also contains artificial ones. The preservative is also added to prolong the expiry date. About the dosage, for the young bird, one tablespoon per day is reasonable. 2 to 4 spoons are good for the medium animals each day.

For parrot in particularly, 1/8 cup to 1/4 cup each is good for the small ones. Feeding the full-grown parrots with 1/4 to 1/2 cup one day is perfect. With the natural elements from vegetables and fruits, Volkman Avian Science Super African Grey provides the African greys with the essential nutrition and power for their operation and development.

Kaytee Spray Millet

What to feed your African Grey? Kaytee Spray Millet is the ideal choice for the young birds which are weaning and learning to eat. This food contains the nutritious elements which are suggested to add to the diet of birds. All the ingredients are natural, and there is no artificial material.

Kaytee Spray Millet is reviewed as the best food for African Greys, and almost the birds love this favorite flavor. With the natural millet, this product is recommended to use for the fledglings in the process of weaning. However, it is also the perfect choice for all young birds and full-grown ones.

It is a palatable food so that it can attract all types of animals. The main ingredient is millet. Besides, with the other nutritious vitamins, minerals, and so on, your small friends are provided with enough power for daily activity.

About feeding, it is better to put the food bowl in an easily accessible position. Furthermore, remember to keep the seeds far from the cage bottom to avoid contamination. If you can, try to clean the bowl once a week. Feeding your pets with Kaytee Spray Millet usually in a long time can make them healthier. Many bird owners said that this type of food is really effective in fattening their pets.

Kaytee Fiesta Bird Food

Among many bird food brands in the market, Kaytee is one of the most famous and popular brands. About the Kaytee Fiesta Bird Food For Parrots, it contains a range of essential ingredients which are good for heart health. By adding Omega 3’S and antioxidants to the food, this product brings an impressive result in health generally and even enhances the immune ability. These elements are good for the brand as well. Furthermore, the food also provides important materials to have healthy skin and a beautiful feather.

Don’t Forget the Water!

Hydration is just as important for birds as it is for human beings especially during hot weather conditions, lack of water can lead to dehydration which can cause these birds to collapse. Your African Greys should be given access to clean, fresh and cool water. Do not use tap water because can cause the bird to be ill, as well as distilled water, instead use unflavored bottled drinking water or bottled natural spring water. If in case, tap water is used, treat it with a de-chlorinating treatment. Inability to provide fresh water to pet birds can cause upset stomach with unbearable stomachache.

Whether the meal consists of raw or cooked food, vegetables or meat African Greys have a habit of drinking water after every meal which helps their digestion process. All water given to birds for drinking, as well as water used for misting, soaking or bathing must be 100% free of chlorine and heavy metals.

Keep In Mind

What to feed your African Grey? Dairy products or cheese are not harmful, but you should feed your parrot in a limited amount. The reason is that the digestive system of birds cannot handle lactose. If you feed your birds with over nutrition, it causes obese, and it is not good for animals. In summary, consumers may feel confused with a lot of food types for African greys in the market. However, by considering the kind of parrot, the nutrition needs and the health issue of your pets, we believe that you can find out the best food for African greys.

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What Are Toxic Foods for Your African Grey? https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/what-are-toxic-foods-for-your-african-grey/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=what-are-toxic-foods-for-your-african-grey https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/what-are-toxic-foods-for-your-african-grey/#respond Sat, 25 Apr 2020 06:35:00 +0000 http://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/?p=777 In the wild, an African Grey parrot’s diet includes a variety of seeds, nuts, fruits, and berries. As a bird owner, it is your responsibility to care for your African Grey parrot to the best of your abilities. This includes feeding it properly. African Grey parrots are omnivorous creatures who can bond with humans well, […]

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In the wild, an African Grey parrot’s diet includes a variety of seeds, nuts, fruits, and berries. As a bird owner, it is your responsibility to care for your African Grey parrot to the best of your abilities. This includes feeding it properly. African Grey parrots are omnivorous creatures who can bond with humans well, trusting them to the point of eating almost everything they are offered.

However, there are times when humans unintentionally feed African Grey toxic foods, leading to the birds getting sick or, in severe cases, dying.

To prevent this from happening, here’s a list of foods you should never feed to your African Grey parrot.

Avocado

Avocados are toxic foods to African Grey parrots; ingesting the skin and pit of avocados have been known to result to cardiac distress and eventual heart failure in various bird species. After eating an avocado product, your African Grey may experience shallow breathing, excessive preening, and lack of appetite, which may subsequently lead to more serious complications.

Chocolate

Though a guilty indulgence for humans, chocolate might as well be poison for birds. It contains the chemical theobromine, which may cause vomiting and diarrhea in your pet bird. In severe cases, it can also affect the bird’s central nervous system, leading to arrhythmia, seizures, and death.

Coffee and caffeinated beverages

You might need caffeine to function, but it is extremely hazardous for your African Grey. It can result to cardiac malfunction in bird species and is linked with increased heartbeat, arrhythmia, and hyperactivity.

Instead of coffee or tea, give your African Grey toxic foods some fruit juice or vegetable juice instead.

Onions

Onions make our dishes delicious and delightful, but they can cause fatal condition for your pet bird. Ingestion of onions in bird species can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, as well as other problems in the digestive system. Furthermore, prolonged exposure to onions can result to hemolytic anemia, wherein red blood cells are quickly destroyed and removed from the bloodstream.

Salt

Keep any and all salty foods away from your African Grey. Saltine crackers or chips shouldn’t be given to your bird, nor should you offer it any foods with high sodium content. This includes fast food, crackers, and canned vegetables. Feeding your African Grey with salty foods can lead to its dehydration, kidney dysfunction, and even death.

Seeds or pits of fruits

Fruits such as apples, apricots, cherries, pears, peaches, and plums can be enjoyed well, but be wary of their seeds, which are known to contain trace amounts of cyanide. Before feeding your African Grey these fruits, ensure that all the seeds and pits have been removed. Take away the skin as well, since there may be pesticides lingering on it that could be African Grey toxic foods.  

Tomato leaves, vines, and stems

Tomatoes are tasty treats for you African Grey. But before giving it to them, remove all leaves, stems, and vines as these parts are highly poisonous to them. Thoroughly wash the tomatoes beforehand as well in order to remove traces of pesticide and other toxins.

Alcoholic beverages

It is common sense to not give a pet bird, or any pet for that matter, an alcoholic beverage. However, there may be times when your African Grey toxic foods is given freedom to roam around the room and help itself to various food and drinks supply. A cocktail left unattended may look or smell promising to them. Remove all such beverages away from your African Grey, as alcohol depresses the organ systems of bird species. Alcohol ingestion can have fatal consequences.

Other African Grey toxic foods are the following:

  • Asparagus
  • Carbonated sodas
  • Chestnuts
  • Chives
  • Cigarette tobacco
  • Cumin and cumin powder
  • Dried beans
  • Dried fruits
  • Garlic
  • Gatorade
  • Leeks
  • Mushrooms
  • Nutmeg
  • Olives
  • Parsley
  • Rhubarb

If you’re unsure when a particular food is bad for your African Grey, consult with your avian veterinary. It’s better to be safe than sorry, after all.

Emergency Care Kit for Your African Grey

In case you accidently fed your African Grey something that is toxic, it is important that you have an emergency kit on hand. This can help you treat your African Grey in the meantime before you can get help from a professional avian veterinarian.

  • Corn starch or styptic powder, which can be used to stop bleeding for toenails, beaks, or feathers
  • Pedialyte to help replace electrolytes in sick or dehydrated birds
  • Hemostat, fine needle-nose pliers, and tweezers
  • Betadine – to disinfect a bleeding wound
  • Sterile saline solution
  • Towel
  • Sterile gauze to cover wounds and injuries
  • Scissors to cut the gauze
  • Q-tips
  • Syringes
  • Heating pad to keep your African Grey parrot warm
  • Small carrier for transport and emergency housing

Keep your African Grey’s bird medical records on hand, as well as the vet’s contact information. It is recommended that you take note of the closest clinics to your home and which ones are open for emergencies no matter the hour.  We hope in this article, you learned about African Grey toxic foods.

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Why Does My African Grey Bite? https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/why-does-my-african-grey-bite/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=why-does-my-african-grey-bite https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/why-does-my-african-grey-bite/#respond Tue, 17 Mar 2020 06:32:00 +0000 http://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/?p=775 African Grey parrots don’t typically bite each other in the wild; just the same, biting behavior is not normally seen even in captivity. However, there are some instances wherein African Greys, like other pet birds, turn to biting their owners. It is not an intrinsic problem; instead, it typically stems from behavioral issues. This means […]

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African Grey parrots don’t typically bite each other in the wild; just the same, biting behavior is not normally seen even in captivity. However, there are some instances wherein African Greys, like other pet birds, turn to biting their owners. It is not an intrinsic problem; instead, it typically stems from behavioral issues. This means that there is hope for correction of the behavior, to the benefit of both the bird and the owner.

Biting in African Greys is a learned behavior. Just because your African Grey bite doesn’t mean that it is naturally mean or aggressive.  In order to get started on correcting the biting behavior, you as the bird owner first have to understand what triggers it in the first place. 

Common Causes of African Grey Biting

If you were a bird, what could possibly compel you to bite a human? There may be changes in your environment that makes you feel unsafe. You may have come from a place where it’s scary and hard to trust humans.

There are a variety of factors which could have led to biting. Depending on how the human responds to the first instances of African Grey bite may then continue to develop this as a habit that the human would have to work on to break.

Here are a few common causes of African Grey bite:

Fear

Fear is one of the most common reason for aggression in the animal kingdom, and this holds true for African Greys as well. If they are hurt or afraid, the flight-or-flight response is triggered naturally as instincts take over. In the wild, it’s easier for African Grey parrots to pick “flight” and fly away when something startles or terrifies them. In captivity, however, that’s difficult to achieve, which is when they may pick “fight” and attack instead.

Even an African Grey that has been hand-fed as a baby can still develop wariness of humans, especially if it hasn’t been socialized consistently. For adult African Greys, the fear may also stem from past trauma or bad experiences in previous homes.

To correct fear biting:

If you think fear is the cause of your African Grey bite, you have to learn to be patient in earning its trust. The fear may seem illogical to you as a human who just wants to care for your pet bird, but you have to consider the situation from its perspective. After all, it doesn’t understand human logic, and thus the burden of making changes and accommodating its particular needs falls on you.

Figure out what makes the African Grey afraid. Once you’ve discerned what caused the fear, you can address it in either of two ways. One is to avoid exposing your African Grey to it, which is often the simplest option. For instance, if your African Grey parrot is afraid of vacuum cleaners, you simply have to take it to another room when you’re vacuuming.  

If complete avoidance isn’t possible, then you’re going to have to work a bit harder to condition your pet bird. Try exposing it to the cause of the fear from a distance, far enough away for the object to not be considered a threat. Then steadily move it closer as time goes on. In every milestone, give the bird some positive reinforcement like a praise or a treat in order to help it associate the object with good things instead of fear.

Control or territorial dominance

African Grey bite can be territorial creatures that value their personal space. In the wild, they can be fiercely protective of their young and their nests, and this could translate into their behavior in captivity too.  

To correct biting caused by territorial behavior

Since being protective of its personal space is innate, there really isn’t much you can do to change that, and nor should you. Instead, respect your African Grey’s need to have its own space. You could consider getting it a spacious cage that allows you to change its food and water from the outside. Additionally, refrain from reaching into the cage to take the African Grey out; they may learn to associate your hands to aggression and invasiveness. Instead, use a stick to coax and help it out of its cage, or simply wait for it to come to that decision itself.

Hormones

Mood swings caused by hormonal changes aren’t an exclusive human experience. Animals go through it too! Your African Grey may become as moody and irritable as a stereotypical teenager during its molting periods or breeding season, causing it to bite.

To correct biting caused by hormonal changes

Just like in human teenagers, a moody African Grey parrot is best handled by giving it the space and respect it needs. If your African Grey bite doesn’t want attention, then leave it alone and don’t force interactions lest you lose its trust. If it wants your attention, then talk nicely to it and give it treats. Remember: reward good behavior, but don’t punish your pet for something it cannot control.

How to Stop Your Parrot from Biting

Take the time to understand your African Grey bite and its personality. Study its body language and try to figure out what triggers the biting response. Not everyone can be a natural at bird taming, but given enough time, effort, and training, they can learn the skills needed in order to effectively handle a pet bird.

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Household Hazards to Keep Away for African Greys https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/household-hazards-to-keep-away-for-african-greys/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=household-hazards-to-keep-away-for-african-greys https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/household-hazards-to-keep-away-for-african-greys/#respond Mon, 09 Mar 2020 06:30:00 +0000 http://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/?p=773 Before bringing home a newborn child, you first prepare your home, baby-proofing every corner to ensure their safety. Similarly, you will want to take precautions before taking home an African Grey parrot. There are a number of factors you have to consider in order to create a safe environment for your pet bird and keep […]

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Before bringing home a newborn child, you first prepare your home, baby-proofing every corner to ensure their safety. Similarly, you will want to take precautions before taking home an African Grey parrot. There are a number of factors you have to consider in order to create a safe environment for your pet bird and keep them away from household hazards.

Your home, unbeknownst to you, contains substances that might be safe for your but can be potentially toxic for your African Grey. And since parrots, and birds in general, are curious creatures, they tend to explore their surroundings a lot and thus may get themselves into dangerous situations around your home if you’re not careful.

If you want to keep your African Grey healthy and happy at home, watch out for these potential dangers.

Airborne Chemicals

Birds have the most efficient respiratory system in the world, but this comes at a price: they’re extremely sensitive to airborne chemicals and toxins. Several minutes of exposure to toxic air can cause a bird to keel over. Canaries, in particular, have been known to be particularly sensitive to carbon monoxide, to the point that they used to be utilized by coal miners to determine if the mine had poisonous gases.

Your African Grey, like all birds, have a respiratory system that is tremendously delicate. Scented candles and even most cleaning chemicals can be fatal to them. Keep your African Grey away from the room if you’re using these products, as well as aerosol sprays, perfumes, air fresheners, incense, and others with a strong scent.

If you’re using a non-stick pan, pot, and other such things marked with PTFE, keep your African Grey far too. These are deadly to birds; smoke from overheated Teflon is enough for them to collapse.

Sprays and Chemicals

Don’t spray any Household hazards chemicals like insecticides near your African Grey either. Just breathing in the fumes is dangerous. Make sure the air your African Grey is breathing in is clean and fresh.

If you’re planning to clean, ditch the chemical cleaners if possible and switch to natural alternatives. If this is not feasible, ensure that your African Grey is in a different room, preferably as far away from where the cleaning is happening as possible.

Smoking Sensitive

African Greys are also sensitive to smoke from cigarettes and nicotine or tobacco products. Even fumes left over from clothes can be toxic to them. If your hands have traces of nicotine and you decide to pet your African Grey regardless, then it may get dermatitis and other skin problems. If you want to smoke, do it far away from your African Grey and leave no trace of the smoke behind.

In cases when your Household hazards would have to be treated for pest infestations, and a ton of chemicals will be released in the air, it’s best to just relocate your African Grey for a few days. Before taking your parrot back home, make sure that all traces of toxins and fumes have been removed.

Electrical Cords

African Greys, and other birds, are famous nibblers, and whichever material they reach is fair game to them. Your African Grey may have fun while chewing, but it is fun that won’t last as it could have detrimental effects on its health. Regardless of whether the cords are plugged in or not, they are a huge hazard. Ensure that any cord is hidden away from your African Grey when you decide to let it fly around your home.

Ceiling Fans

Ceiling fans are helpful in ensuring that the air is flowing well throughout the room, but they are dangerous to African Greys especially when in use. Make sure to turn off your ceiling fans whenever your African Grey is flying around to prevent clipping its wings, which may cause it to get injured or even die.

Lead-containing Products

Products with lead, zinc, and cadium should be removed from your African Grey’s environment. These substances can be lethal to your parrot especially when ingested and not treated in time. Many household items contain these elements, so you have to be extra careful. Don’t leave pens and pencils unattended. Keep away lead-based paints, pennies, linoleum, foils, and jewelry.

Unattended Liquids

Your African Grey parrot may take a keen interest in water and other liquids like juice. It may fall into any of these liquids and drown itself. Don’t forget to cover up any source of water in the house when your African Grey is flying around. Close the lid on toilet bowls and don’t leave the bath unattended; better yet, close the door to all bathrooms. Make sure there’s no water in the sink or dishwasher either.

Also, don’t leave coffee or other caffeinated drinks lying around the house. Aside from drowning, these substances can cause cardiac malfunction in your African Grey when ingested too.

African Greys are intelligent, curious, and affectionate creatures. They deserve a loving home, and you can start providing that for them through foresight and carefulness. Ensure that they’ll have a safe, trusting environment away from Household hazards so that they can keep you company for a long time.

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What Is Your African Grey Communicating to You? https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/what-is-your-african-grey-communicating-to-you/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=what-is-your-african-grey-communicating-to-you https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/what-is-your-african-grey-communicating-to-you/#respond Mon, 20 Jan 2020 06:27:00 +0000 http://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/?p=771 African Grey parrots can’t speak and tell you what they’re thinking through words, so understanding them through body language is the next best thing. After all, body language says a lot about you, and this holds true for animals and birds too. Your African Grey communicating can be telling you a million things through subtle […]

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African Grey parrots can’t speak and tell you what they’re thinking through words, so understanding them through body language is the next best thing. After all, body language says a lot about you, and this holds true for animals and birds too. Your African Grey communicating can be telling you a million things through subtle cues, so you have to be observant to not miss these messages. Being watchful of the signs your African Grey communicating leads to better understanding it, helping you develop and strong and trusting relationship that can last a long time.

Picking up the signals they send can enable you to form a solid bond. Being attuned to their needs and wants can help you know when it’s feeling fine or when he’s ill. This is certainly useful when detecting sickness and preventing it from progressing.

Most animals are open books; they don’t really know how to hide what they’re feeling in the way humans do. Once you have learned the usual signs and signals, understanding what your African Grey communicating feeling will come easier with time and practice. You will know when your pet bird is happy, excited, wary, or terrified just by noticing its eyes, stance, and reactions.

EYES

Eye Pinning

When it comes to African Grey communicating, an African Grey’s pupils can contract and expand when it sees something that either excites or threatens it. It depends on the context: If your African Grey’s eyes are pinning while the rest of its body is relaxed, then it probably sees something interesting, such as a new toy. On the other hand, if you observe pinning while the African Grey’s feathers are puffed out, then be careful because it is probably angry or frightened and thus has a tendency to attack through biting.

Pinning in parrots is a normal behavior better observed in some types than in others. How well you can see the pinning relies on the color of the bird’s irises and how much they blend with the pupil.

Partially Closed Eyes

If you see your African Grey partially close its eyes while you’re petting it or smoothing its feathers, it means that they are content. You should continue your ministrations, perhaps until your parrot falls asleep.

FEATHERS

Preening

Preening can only be done by a completely relaxed bird who is confident with the knowledge that its environment is safe. To preen, your African Grey communicating would need to bury its head in its feathers or under its wings, which can be a show of vulnerability. In the wild, African Greys only preen when there are no predators nearby. In captivity, they preen when they trust you or everyone in their immediate vicinity.

For preening, birds use the preen gland located just above their tails. This gland produces the oil your African Grey communicating uses to rub on its feathers in order to clean itself. This is important to keep your African Grey’s skin from being dry, which could cause irritation and itchiness. If you have two African Greys, they will spend their time preening each other as a bonding activity.

Fluffing

Usually, an African Grey fluffs up its feathers to release tension, much like how humans stretch their muscles. They typically do it before preening, so that all the dust or particles trapped in their feathers can be shaken loose.

Fluffing up can also be a sign of excitement or greeting, along with stretched-out wings. However, if your African Grey fluffs out its feathers for a prolonged period, then it may be not feeling well. You should contact your avian veterinarian immediately to check if it is a sign of illness that needs to be treated.

HEAD AND BEAK

Bowing and Bobbing

If your African Grey communicating bows and bobs its head, it typically means it’s asking for your attention. Sometimes, African Greys do it to ask for food or water. It can also be a sign of excitement and interest. Be careful, however, and learn to distinguish if the movement is a simple “Give me attention” technique or if it could be a sign of illness.

Lowered Head and Neck Out

If your African Grey adopts this stance, dropping its head towards you, it means it wants to be petted and given attention.

Beak Grinding

African Greys grind their beaks to show their contentment. They usually do this whenever they are about to fall asleep. This is a good sign since it means your African Grey is relaxed and satisfied.

Yawning

If your African Grey is yawning, it means it’s either tired or has a piece of food stuck in its esophagus. It’s best to double check to ensure your parrot isn’t choking.

BODY, LEGS, AND FEET

Body Quivering

A shaking body usually means your African Grey is feeling scared or threatened. It may be feeling distrustful of its current environment. If this is the case, your African Grey’s eyes will also be dilated and your pet will be breathing heavily as well. Sometimes, however, a quivering body is a sign of illness, in which case you have to consult with an avian veterinary immediately.

Crouched Legs

If your African Grey is crouched down on its perch with its wings extended, then it’s a sign that it’s about to take off. If it’s leaning forward with its wings shaking, it’s about to launch itself at you, so you better brace yourself.

Remember: the better you communicate and understand your African Grey parrot, the better and stronger your bond will be. Keep a watchful eye out and respond accordingly to what you observe, and you and your African Grey can enjoy a trusting bond for a long time!

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Why Does My African Grey do Feather Plucking? https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/why-does-my-african-grey-do-feather-plucking/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=why-does-my-african-grey-do-feather-plucking https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/why-does-my-african-grey-do-feather-plucking/#respond Fri, 20 Dec 2019 06:23:00 +0000 http://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/?p=764 Feather plucking, also called feather picking, is a known unpleasant habit of African Grey parrots. It is more specifically seen in Congo African Grey than in Timneh African Grey, but either way, this habit is something that all African Grey owners fear and dread. In the wild, feather plucking is done by birds for several […]

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Feather plucking, also called feather picking, is a known unpleasant habit of African Grey parrots. It is more specifically seen in Congo African Grey than in Timneh African Grey, but either way, this habit is something that all African Grey owners fear and dread.

In the wild, feather plucking is done by birds for several reasons. Most notably, they use their plucked feathers to line their nests during breeding season. However, in captivity, African Grey feather plucking could be a sign of behavioral, health, or environmental problems for your bird.

What are the causes of feather plucking in African Grey parrots?

Once you have noted that your African Grey feather plucking has started plucking its feathers, you should immediate take it to an avian veterinarian for a check-up. If it is determined that your African Grey is free of psittacine beak and feather disease and other physical illness, then it is most likely that the feather plucking is caused by an environmental issue.  

To assess the cause of your African Grey’s feather plucking, the vet will conduct a complete physical examination, which may include taking a blood sample. This is to ensure that all factors are considered and that proper treatment will be given to correct the behavior before it progresses further.  

Malnutrition and diet

Does your African Grey eat a healthy diet?  An unhealthy diet can lead to nutritional deficiency, which can stress your African Grey out to the point of resorting to feather plucking. If you think the feed for your African Grey feather plucking can be better, try including some fresh fruits and vegetables. Of course, you should wash these products thoroughly before giving them to your bird. You should also remove seeds and pits, as these could be toxic for your African Grey. Some seeds have trace amounts of mycotoxins, and the seeds of fruits such as apples, peaches, and apricots have trace amounts of cyanide.

Parasites

Parasites can also be a cause for your African Grey feather plucking. They are detrimental to your bird’s overall health. Have your African Grey checked out by the avian vet to see if it is suffering from either internal or external parasites. External parasites, in particular, cause itchiness and irritation that could result to excessive preening and plucking. Some external parasites that can be found on bird feathers are lice and mites. The vet will prescribe medication to remove internal parasites or an avian-safe insecticide spray or powder for external parasites. 

Lack of Sleep

Does your African Grey get enough sleep? It needs more sleep than the average human; your African Grey needs to get 8 to 12 hours of uninterrupted sleep to be healthy. It is better if you provide a dark, secluded place for your African Grey to comfortably rest.

Environmental factors

Is there too much noise or disturbance where you’re housing your African Grey? If your parrot is constantly exposed to such distractions, keeping it awake, it can lead to stress and anxiety causing it to pluck its feathers. Make sure to provide your African Grey with a calm, quiet environment that is conducive to resting.

You should also avoid its exposure to environmental toxins such as tobacco smoke, aerosol fumes, floor polish, and other such substances that may cause allergies or discomfort. Room fresheners, scented candles, and perfumes can also irritate an African Grey feather plucking, so make sure to keep these products away from them too.

The natural habitat of African Grey parrots is the tropical rainforests of Central Africa. This is why they are naturally pre-disposed to medium to high levels of humidity. If the humidity levels are too low, it may lead to dry skin and feather follicles. It is suggested that the humidity levels be maintained at around 60%. You can use humidifiers near your African Grey. Be sure that the area isn’t too wet either, lest mold spores set in.

Clean Cage

Another environmental factor you should consider is the cleanliness of your African Grey’s cage. Since they are naturally hygienic animals, a dirty cage can lead to detrimental consequences for them. Regularly clean their cage, and give them regular baths too. If possible, expose them to moisture and steam while you are taking a shower.

Boredom and loneliness

African Grey parrots need lots of attention from their flock. In the wild, they keep their boredom in check by being busy most of the time foraging for food. In captivity, this isn’t the case, as food and water are constantly provided.

Boredom can easily set in when there aren’t mentally stimulated. When left alone for too long, your African Grey feather plucking can feel debilitating loneliness that causes stress, leading to self-mutilation through excessive feather plucking.

To keep this from happening, provide your African Grey parrot with a variety of toys to chew on, play with, take apart, and put back together. Their toys should come in different shapes and sizes, and better if they have different textures as well. Provide entertainment by placing its cage by the window during the day, enabling it to watch outside.

If possible, consider getting your African Grey a mate who will keep it company even when you’re not there. Aside from easing loneliness, a mate can also help alleviate your African Grey’s boredom, as parrots spend much time grooming each other.

Correcting the Feather Plucking Behavior

It is important that you take your African Grey to a vet immediately once you’ve noted it has started plucking its feathers. This could become a habit, so it’s best to nip it in the bud before it escalates. Also, remember to not outwardly express dismay when you see your African Grey feather plucking; giving it such attention can encourage the behavior further. Be calm as you take steps to keep your African Grey’s beautiful plumage neat and intact.

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Where to Get an African Grey? https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/where-to-get-an-african-grey/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=where-to-get-an-african-grey https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/where-to-get-an-african-grey/#respond Mon, 14 Oct 2019 11:52:37 +0000 http://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/?p=628 Where to get an African Grey? In terms of geographic range, the two known species have varying ranges. Congo African grey parrot inhabits a range extending from Kenya to the eastern border of the Ivory Coast while the Timneh African grey parrot has a range from eastern border of Ivory Coast to Guinea – Bissau. […]

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Where to get an African Grey? In terms of geographic range, the two known species have varying ranges. Congo African grey parrot inhabits a range extending from Kenya to the eastern border of the Ivory Coast while the Timneh African grey parrot has a range from eastern border of Ivory Coast to Guinea – Bissau. Where to get an African Grey? They make their nests in tree holes and makes seasonal movements out of the driest part of the region in the dry season. In this article, you’ll learn all about these wonderful birds and where to get an African Grey?

All About the Greys

Where to get an African Grey? These parrots typically measure 33 cm from head to tail and weigh up to 407 grams. They have an average wingspan of 46 – 52 cm. In terms of reproduction, the breeding season varies by locality but appears to coincide with the dry season. They breed once to twice a year.

Breeding

Breeding occurs in loose colonies with each pair occupying its own tree. Females lay three to five roundish eggs, one each at intervals of two to five days. Incubation takes about thirty days and the young emerge from the nest at approximately twelve weeks old. Both parents care for their clutch of young until they reach independence. In the wild, their average lifespan is 23 years, but in captivity, they last for forty five years, and can live up to sixty years! Now that’s for keeps!

Impressive Vocals

Wild African Grey parrots follow a daily pattern of vocalization; their impressive mimicry is also part of the fascinating facts about them, scientific studies have shown that they are able to make the connection mentally between words and their meanings, to express certain preferences and even to apply concepts such as color, shape and number.

A Vegetarian Breed

These birds are mostly herbivores. They feed primarily on nuts and fruits such as oil- palm, and supplemented by leafy matter, as well as insects and flowers.

African Grey parrots are vulnerable to terrestrial predators which makes them a near threatened species. They are the most popular avian pet in United States, Europe and Middle East.

Where to Get an African Grey: Breeder’s Choice

Where to get an African Grey? The first thing you need to do is to look for a legit avian breeder or pet store in your area that specializes in African greys.  You can also find great avian breeders online but you have to take into consideration the validity of the breeder. It is highly recommended that you see your new bird in person before buying anything on the internet.

Interact with the Bird

Spend as much time as you can with your prospective new grey before you buying.  Interact with the bird and see how it is with you. Continue the diet of the bird as advised by the store owner or breeder to maintain its eating habits. Look for any health problems or issues as well. 

Banding

Make sure to only purchase an African Grey that is banded. Banding means the bird have a small metal band on one of its legs placed at birth by the breeder which is inscribed with the bird’s clutch number, date of birth and the breeder number. Leg bands are indicators that the purchaser and the bird itself are in the country legally and have not been smuggled.

Life Expectancy

African Greys can live for up to 45 years and more, these birds are long time companions, and its longevity depends on how your chosen breeders took care of them especially when they were just babies. Your African Grey will reach the fullest of its lifetime if on the onset you already chose a healthy breed. Some of the things you need to look out for when deciding where to get an African Grey and how includes; the bird is perky, active and alert; it should have bright and clear eyes; it should appear well groomed with neat feathers; the feathers should be mostly smoothed to the body at rest – not continually fluffed. The feet and legs should be smooth and free of lumps, scabs and rough scales. The bird is healthy is when it’s confident and inquisitive, although cautious and aware at the same time.

Where to Get an African Grey: Important Reminder

There would be instances that your pet will be out of its cage; after all, what’s the point of its beauty and intelligence if you won’t let it fly right? However, it’s also important to keep in mind on how to properly handle and train your Grey bird so that it will not cause harm to itself and to people as well.

Training an African Grey is not that hard to do, in fact it can be a fun and rewarding bonding experience for you and your feathered friend! Unlike any other bird, your Grey’s level of comprehension allows it to relatively absorb information very quickly and easily. Trust is the most important key in training your parrot. The first thing you need to do is to be able to establish a solid connection and rapport between you and your pet. We hope this article answered your question, where to get an African Grey? Stay tune for more posts!

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Can I Keep African Grey as a Pet? https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/can-i-keep-african-grey-as-a-pet/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=can-i-keep-african-grey-as-a-pet https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/can-i-keep-african-grey-as-a-pet/#respond Tue, 01 Oct 2019 11:47:29 +0000 http://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/?p=625 Can I keep African Grey as a pet? The best answer to this is that you have to first know if this is the right parrot for you. Some bird species are very welcoming to other pets but with African Greys? Not so much. Can I keep African Grey as a pet? The Timneh may […]

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Can I keep African Grey as a pet? The best answer to this is that you have to first know if this is the right parrot for you. Some bird species are very welcoming to other pets but with African Greys? Not so much. Can I keep African Grey as a pet? The Timneh may be more capable of accepting new family members than the Congo, but as with all birds, behavior is highly individual. Nevertheless, Greys can learn to socialize and accept every member of the family. It depends largely on how you train it. Young African Greys often get along with other birds but if a mature grey is a first bird, it is more likely that it may not warm up to new birds unless they are carefully introduced.

Experts suggest that the best behaved grey parrots are those who were exposed to lots of change in the environment, noises and people because they become more adjusted. In this article, you’ll learn the answer to your question; can I keep African Grey as a pet?

Can I Keep African Grey as a Pet: What You Need to Know

African grey petsare loving, playful and highly intelligent birds. However, they can be quite sensitive, has a bit of temper; and needs lots of attention compare to other birds. They have a beautifully crafted complexity when it comes to their physique. But because of this the rice of the parrot ranges from is quite expensive because it has better speaking skills than other bird species. Greys don’t scream like other parrots, they only whistle, click and beep. They can be single birds, unlike other bird species, greys behaviors are highly individual. 

A few things that may not be likeable about them are that they like to chew things. Do not leave them out of the cage and unattended. They do not like to cuddle as well; they do not appreciate intense physical contact. Just a few scratches will do! You will find yourself constantly learning about these creatures. It will be an educational experience for you.

Can I Keep African Grey as a Pet: Owner Responsibilities

Can I keep African Grey as a pet? Owning an African Grey parrot is more expensive than an average bird, so make sure that before you buy one, you can cover the necessary costs it entails.  The initial expenses associated with keeping African Grey as pets include the cost of the bird itself as well as the cage, cage accessories, toys, and grooming supplies.  The price is generally higher for African grey parrots than the price for buying other types of parrots because of its ability to learn the nuances and intonation of human speech, which makes the prices of these parrots higher than other birds. It also depends on the size of the bird.

You will need a large, strong and secure cage. Cages of this size do not come cheap! You should buy something that preferably has lots of space suitable for cage play and activity. You will also need cage accessories like perches, lights, feeding dishes, stands, cage covers and harnesses for your African Grey Parrot. Accessories can be quite expensive depending on the brand as well as the quality of your purchase.

A Clever Breed

As one of the most clever parrot species, your African Grey needs plenty of stimulation to keep their intelligent and active minds entertained. Keep birdie boredom at bay with chewable toys for your Grey parrot.  As part of pet hygiene, your feathered friend needs to be cleaned and properly groomed. There are lots of grooming supplies that you can buy online or in your local pet store.

Parrot Essentials

Can I keep African Grey as a pet? The monthly costs associated with keeping an African Grey is definitely not for cheapskates! Some of the things that needs to be bought on a monthly basis like food supplements, cleaning materials and even veterinary care every now and then will definitely add up to your expenses.

Your African Grey needs a varied and healthy diet. There’s a massive selection of high quality seed diets, complete food and pelleted foods to choose from both online and in your local pet stores, as mentioned before, the cost will depend on the brand as well as the nutritional value of the food. Feeding a variety of these foods, alongside fruits and vegetables is the key to a healthy parrot. If your African Grey is a fussy feeder, then buy supplements including vitamins and minerals in which you can add to either food or water. You don’t need brand new cleaning supplies every month, but of course, you will run out of bird shampoo and soap eventually. Just include it in your budget.

Keep Them Healthy!

Always take your grey to an avian vet for any medical treatment.  Avian vets are trained specifically to work with exotic birds whereas a general practicing vet may not be familiar with their needs and treatments especially if they are sick, not to mention the medicines needed. In addition to all of these monthly costs you should plan for occasional extra costs like repairs to your grey cage, replacement toys, food supplements, medicines etc. You won’t have to cover these costs every month but you should include it in your budget to be safe. We hope this article answered your question can I keep African Grey as a pet? Stay tune for more posts!

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What to Feed African Greys? https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/what-to-feed-african-greys/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=what-to-feed-african-greys https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/what-to-feed-african-greys/#respond Mon, 16 Sep 2019 11:43:11 +0000 http://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/?p=622 What to feed African Greys? African Grey parrots are largely considered omnivorous due to lack of fixed food preferences. Its food preferences are mostly based on its natural habitat. What to feed African Greys? Today’s supplements have opened new and healthy options for pet owners. In this article, you will be guided on how to […]

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What to feed African Greys? African Grey parrots are largely considered omnivorous due to lack of fixed food preferences. Its food preferences are mostly based on its natural habitat. What to feed African Greys? Today’s supplements have opened new and healthy options for pet owners. In this article, you will be guided on how to properly feed your parrot and learn the nutritional requirements they need and answer your question, what to feed African Greys?

What to Feed African Greys: Food Staples

Contrary to popular belief, birds do not live by seed alone. A seed only diet can be extremely dangerous because it can result in nutrient deficiency and diseases due to its limited nutrients, vitamins and minerals which could shorten the life expectancy of your parrot. What to feed African Greys? African grey needs a good quality pellet diet for it to be healthy. Like humans, parrots need a balanced diet. You should be able to feed your bird with fresh vegetables especially green leafy ones as well as fruit and grain daily.

What to Feed African Greys: Food Tips

Feed them Seeds

African Grey Parrots love to eat seeds. Palm fruit seeds are highly recommended on a Grey parrot’s diet plan. However as mentioned earlier, you still need to offer a proper balance of fruits and vegetables because that will keep the bird’s metabolic system strong. What to feed African Greys? African Grey needs 3 – 4 teaspoons per day of a pellet or seed – based, fortified parrot diet.

Offer them Veggies

What to feed African Greys? Vegetables are a rich source of natural fiber for the body. As compared to other birds, there are a few vegetables which is essential for an African Grey, these vegetables not only provide fiber but also nutrition. Just make sure they are properly washed before feeding to your pet. You can feed them sweet potato; it can be served in the cooked and mashed form. You can also serve them carrots; it can be served in the boiled form. Peppers (green, red, and yellow) betters are high in vitamin C, which is essential for the bird’s immune system.

You should also feed them spinach, broccoli and cauliflower; these can be consumed raw or cooked. Yellow and Butter nut squashes, kale, celery, cucumbers, green beans, peas (garden and snow) and leaf lettuce to name a few.

Provide them Fruits

What to feed African Grey? Fruits are healthy and sweet, they are a natural source of sugars for the parrots. Keep in mind that you need to get your vet’s approval before trying a new fruit for your African Grey Parrot. This can includes melons, dried dates, figs, gooseberries, mango and papaya, grapes, guava, honeydew, kiwi, apples, banana, blackcurrant, blueberry, cantaloupe, cherry, mango, pear, pineapple, pomegranate, raspberry, and strawberry among others.

Give them Calcium

What to feed African Grey? The only supplement necessary in feeding your parrot is Calcium. African grey birds need the most amount of Calcium than any other kinds of parrots. Follow the instructions on the supplement package. Calcium is vital for muscle contraction, blood clotting, heart functions, bone growth and strength. The bird should be exposed to UVB light for at least 3 – 4 hours a day, for optimal physiologic use of the calcium you are giving your bird.

Keep Them Hydrated

What to feed African Grey? Hydration is just as important for birds as it is for human beings especially during hot weather conditions, lack of water can lead to dehydration which can cause these birds to collapse. Your African Greys should be given access to clean, fresh and cool water. Do not use tap water because can cause the bird to be ill, as well as distilled water, instead use unflavored bottled drinking water or bottled natural spring water.

If in case, tap water is used, treat it with a de-chlorinating treatment. Inability to provide fresh water to pet birds can cause upset stomach with unbearable stomachache. Whether the meal consists of raw or cooked food, vegetables or meat African Greys have a habit of drinking water after every meal which helps their digestion process.

Other Diet Necessities

What to feed African Grey? Vitamin is definitely an important part of any diet because it fulfills body requirements but as a precaution most Grey parrots on a pelleted diet do not require additional vitamins therefore a regular medical consultation to your veterinary is highly advised to ensure that your bird is getting proper diet. Some Greys are prone to vitamin A deficiencies but you should not provide vitamins without an expert’s prescription. What to feed African Grey? Fatty acids are part of a balanced diet combined with minerals, vitamins and calcium. Fatty acid intake serves as an effective skin and feather care agent. It also provides the ability to develop a better immune system so that it may survive possible common diseases among the bird family. It also plays an important role in reducing the risk of heart attacks as well as lowering the cholesterol level.

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How to Keep an African Grey Parrot? https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/how-to-keep-an-african-grey-parrot/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=how-to-keep-an-african-grey-parrot https://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/how-to-keep-an-african-grey-parrot/#respond Mon, 02 Sep 2019 11:29:26 +0000 http://www.africangreyparrotscare.com/?p=613 How to keep an African Grey parrot? Well first of all, you need a clean, warm and mentally stimulating environment. How to keep an African Grey parrot? As a potential owner you need to have knowledge of its habitat requirements and environmental conditions to ensure that your bird is healthy. In this article, you’ll learn […]

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How to keep an African Grey parrot? Well first of all, you need a clean, warm and mentally stimulating environment. How to keep an African Grey parrot? As a potential owner you need to have knowledge of its habitat requirements and environmental conditions to ensure that your bird is healthy. In this article, you’ll learn how to keep an African Grey parrot?

How to Keep African Grey Parrot: Parrot Cages

How to keep an African Grey parrot? An iron parrot cage that is large and rust – free is the best home for a pet African grey. The ideal size of cage for an African Gray parrot is 2 feet deep by 3 feet wide by 4 feet high. Never purchase a round cage. The basic rule of thumb is – the bigger the better! The spacing between the bars of the cage should be no wider than ¾ of an inch. Of course, if the bars are too far apart, your grey might try to squeeze through them because they are naturally curious and they can get stuck.

How to keep an African Grey parrot? Your parrot’s cage could affect the health of your pet so it’s very important that you check it daily for any dirt, like the feces and spoiling food left in perches and cups to prevent health problems. You should also change the cage paper every other day as well as check the metal parts & bars of your bird’s cage periodically for chipped paint and rust, because your bird will most likely chew or swallow the flaked pieces. You should be able to clean the cage thoroughly at least once every month.

Cage Location

How to keep an African Grey parrot? After finding a cage you have to find the ideal place in your home as well. The cage should be placed in a fairly centered room, where there is interaction with people so that the bird will feel part of the flock. The back of the cage should be located against a wall to provide security otherwise it will feel threatened and nervous if it is in direct traffic. The cage should not be placed near the main entrance door of the house because it will feel threatened and nervous if it is in direct traffic and it would also feel disturbed and uncomfortable with new strangers.

How to Keep African Grey Parrot: What Your Parrot Needs

How to keep an African Grey parrot? Having different types of perches will surely exercise the feet to prevent sores and foot related health issues. You will need a good supply of packaged pellet diet, to be mixed with seed. Then you can slowly convert your bird’s diet to a majority of pellet and fresh food.

How to keep an African Grey parrot? African Grey needs more calcium than any other parrots. You should provide a good supplement such as cuttlebone, calcium treat or oyster shell. Avoid sugary treats like honey sticks and human junk food. Feed it treats like Nutriberries or Avi-Cakes.

You should also purchase at least 3 different toys. It will allow you to interchange them in your grey’s cage to prevent boredom. Sometimes everyone needs to have fun! And don’t forget to buy at least 3 sturdy dishes; one for fresh water, one for pellet or seed mix and one for fresh foods.

Environmental Conditions

Your average room temperature for your bird should not exceed 80 degrees. Avoid drafty areas that will get direct heat from sun for any portion of the day. Parrots also have tetra-chromic vision, that’s why a full color light bulb must be present in the cage area. The incandescent or monochromatic light bulbs usually found in households are not a good choice for your bird.

Cover the cage during nighttime; it blocks out any excess light and also creates a more secure sleeping place. Be careful when using fabrics as cover because your bird might rip it with its claws or beak and could likely eat it. Never ever place the cage in the kitchen or somewhere near cooking fumes because African grey are very sensitive, that even a small amount of smoke can be fatal.

Grooming and Hygiene

How to keep an African Grey parrot? When it comes to grooming and hygiene, you need to provide a misting bottle or a birdbath. All birds should be gently misted with a water bottle. Never spray the bird directly in its face. It’s important that you keep an eye in your bird while it is bathing. Bathe your grey often with clean water. Distilled water is sometimes required. Speak to your veterinarian on the best choice of water for your bird. During its misting and bathing procedures, make sure there are no drafts because it can cause respiratory issues. It may chill your bird when he is wet. Use towels and blankets, but be careful because it can catch the bird’s nails and beaks in their threads.

To ensure that the oils from their skin glands, disease organisms or items such as lotions and hand creams do not transfer to your bird’s feathers, wash your hands with soap and water thoroughly before handling your grey. Your bird may be ill if it seems to stop grooming and becomes dirty. Once you see this signs, contact your avian veterinarian immediately. We hope this article answered your question, how to keep an African Grey parrot? Stay tune for more posts!

The post How to Keep an African Grey Parrot? appeared first on African Gray Parrots.


How to Keep an African Grey Parrot? was first posted on September 2, 2019 at 11:29 am.
©2019 "African Gray Parrots". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at admin@africangreyparrotscare.com
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